6-27-15 update from NCIM’s chronic stroke turnaround hero, Dan Huntley (Canada)

DAN HUNTLEY - TDNews photo - 2013On June 27th Nova Cells Institute (NCIM) chronic stroke patient, Dan Huntley (Photo – Truro Daily News (2013), sent this email update to NCIM’s patient educator and care coordinator, Grace Odgers, Ph.D. candidate:

It sounds like you are very busy helping the needy, Grace. Update: I now have movement in my left elbow which was previously locked at a 90 degree to 45 degree angle. Also, my walking continues to improve and I can now actually feel the leg muscles working. Amen, praise God, and God bless you, Grace, and Abel, and all the angels at the hospital in Mexico. Say “Hi “to  Dr. R. for me and to all the nurses also. A big thank you and love to all, Dan 

You can read more about “Mr. Dan’s” remarkable turnaround following his NCIM treatment at https://ncimx.wordpress.com/category/stroke/

Messed up cellular “garbage disposal system” found to play a role in Alzheimer’s disease (And Nova Cell’s BEACON FACTOR coaxes lysosomes to do their job!)

Many neurodegenerative diseases involve a failure of lysosomes (the “garbage disposal” system within cells including neurons) to do their job properly. Now comes evidence that defective or compromised lysosomes may contribute to Alzheimer’s disease, something ably laid out in a 6-30-15 article on the Medical Express website at http://medicalxpress.com/news/2015-06-failure-cells-garbage-disposal-contribute.html. Here is a salient quote from this article:

Lysosomes, the “garbage disposal” systems of cells, are found in great abundance near the amyloid plaques in the brain that are a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease. Scientists have long assumed that their presence was helpful—that they were degrading the toxic proteins that trigger amyloid plaque formation.

However, in Alzheimer’s patients, these lack the ability to do their jobs properly, and instead of helping, the accumulation of lysosomes may even contribute to the disease, Yale University researchers report the week of June 29 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The new findings raise the possibility that coaxing lysosomes to do their jobs could help to prevent the toxic processes that eventually destroy the minds of Alzheimer’s patients.

The big question is how to get lysosomes to do their job as they should. While medicine has little that can pull this off, Nova Cells possesses an effective, nontoxic way to do so: Namely its  proprietary Beacon Factor. Not surprisingly, many patients with neurologic diseases and conditions that involve fouled up lysosomes have responded quickly and beautifully to intravenous infusions of the Beacon Factor. Click to read some of the case histories.

http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2015/06/24/1510329112

MEDICAL EXPRESS ARTICLE ON FAILURE OF LYSOSOMES IN ALZ - June 2015